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Elementary School Restructuring

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    Posted: 15/September/2008 at 9:48pm
Has anyone heard about the proposed school restructuring?  Combining Betsy Ross with Field and Garfield with Grant White?  There would be North and South Schools with K-2 in one and 3-5 in the other.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chuck Hoehne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 9:23am

Here is the plan to convert the elementary schools into "Developmental Centers".

 
Meetings have been scheduled for parents at all the buildings to explain more fully and give parents an opportunity to be heard. A letter will be going out to all parents this week.  The dates for the parents' meetings are as follows:

 

Oct. 1, 6:30 p.m.:  Betsy Ross 

October 6, 6:00 p.m.: Grant-White

October 7, 6:30 p.m.  Garfield

October 8, 6:30 p.m.  Field-Stevenson

  

Forest park public school district 91

 

to:                 Board of Education

from:           Lou Cavallo, Superintendent

subject:     Developmental centers

date:            9/15/2008

cc:                                                                                                                                                                                         

Introduction

Forest Park Public School District 91 and the Board of Education have identified as one of its core values the creation of small, diverse learning communities where students attend their neighborhood school as indicated in the Mission, Vision and Goals of the district.  Unfortunately, this is impossible to accomplish under our current system.   We are faced with several challenges associated with our current practices.  These issues are outlined below:

 

1.                 It is not possible to maintain class sizes of twenty without transferring students out of their home school.

2.                 Class balancing results in us not being able to keep students in their neighborhood schools. 

3.                 It is not possible to staff at a ratio of 20:1.  We are currently staffed at a ratio of 17:1 with several of our classes operating with 15 or fewer students.  This is not fiscally responsible.

4.                 Because we do not know the actual enrollment in any particular grade level until school starts, we are forced to move students at a very late date. 

5.                 When students who are moved to a school due to class-balancing have siblings enter school, it is not always possible to enroll the siblings in the same school, which result in siblings being split between different schools. 

6.                 All of our attendance centers are not racially balanced.

7.                 Transportation costs are incurred when we transport students from their home school to another attendance center.

8.                 As our actual enrollment begins to approach the projected enrollments prepared by Information Management Systems (IMS), consideration must be given to the possibility of declining enrollment.  It is possible that there will not be a need for four elementary schools serving grades K-5 in two to four years (See Appendix A). 

 

Solutions Investigated:

1.                   Disregard the class-size cap of 20 and allow all students to attend their neighborhood attendance center.   This solution solves some issues but not all.  This would result in class sizes throughout the district ranging from 29 to 11 (based on this year’s enrollment).  The goal of attending neighborhood schools is accomplished but small class sizes at all grades would be abandoned.  It is also not fiscally responsible to operate several classes with fewer than 15 students and it is not in the students’ best interest to have large class sizes, especially at the primary level.

2.                   Move attendance center boundaries.  When this solution was investigated, it did not solve the problem.  None of our schools are at capacity, however specific grade levels within the schools are over the class-size cap (i.e. SK might be high and 3rd low at Garfield but Garfield, as a whole, is not overcrowded).  Class balancing would still be required and students would be forced to leave their current school of attendance and natural boundaries (Roosevelt and Madison) would no longer be in place.  Shifting the attendance boundaries does not solve any of the issues.

3.                   Staff the schools based on their enrollment.  We investigated allocating staff based solely on the number of students in attendance with the expectation that the principals assign teaching assignments based on need.  For example, Garfield has an enrollment (SK-5) of 138.  At a class size ratio of 20:1, they would need 7 teachers.  They currently have 8 teachers.  Since we can’t move students from grade to grade to balance out class sizes (move second graders to third so that the second and third grade classes are at twenty), we need an additional teacher to lower the class size at a grade level that is over twenty but not necessarily at forty.  This would also require staff to move from year to year among the grade levels and teacher certification becomes an issue.    

4.                   Close an attendance center.  If our attendance declines and we lose 100 students over the next four years (as predicted), we would not need one of our smaller attendance centers.  While we fill more classes at the other schools to the 20 student class size cap, class balancing (moving students from school to school) would still be required and we would have some grade levels over twenty. 

5.                   Create developmental attendance centers.  This option would require the restructuring of our of attendance centers into two primary centers (K-2) and two intermediate centers (3-5).  The north side of town (north of I-290) would have a primary and an intermediate center and the south side of town (south of I-290) would have a primary and intermediate center.  The primary centers would serve students in grades JK-2 and the intermediate centers would serve students in grades 3-5 (See Appendix B for enrollment scenarios).  Primary students with low-incidence disabilities would be served in one of the primary centers and the intermediate students with low-incidence disabilities would be served in one of the intermediate centers.  Benefits and concerns to this option are discussed below.

 

 

Benefits:

·         Class sizes of 20 can be maintained more easily

·         Students will not be moved to classrooms in other buildings to balance classes (classes balanced within the building)

·         Over staffing (classes of 15 or less) is reduced therefore more financially responsible

·         Students will attend school with their neighborhood peers, JK – 8

·         Provides racial balance

·         Reduces or provides more efficient transportation program

·         JK can be offered to all students in an attendance area at the primary center

·         Developmental centers are more closely focused on the social/emotional needs of students

·         Curriculum and instruction focuses specifically on the developmental group

·         Provides the opportunity to implement innovative strategies such as multi-age classrooms and looping (multi-year instruction by the same teacher) in the future

·         Scheduling reading intervention (SLANT) is much more efficient and easier

·         Specials (music, art, PE, Library) can be more efficiently scheduled

·         More sections of each grade level to better facilitate inclusion of special needs and ESL students

·         Improved collaboration among grade level teachers

·         Eliminates the need to close an attendance center if enrollment declines as predicted

Concerns:

·         Provides an additional transition for students

·         Some families may have siblings in more than one school

·         Loss of sense of community (culture) associated with our current neighborhood schools

·         Half of our students will need to change schools

·         Will require reorganization of our human resources

·         Will require that the primary and intermediate schools on the same side of town collaborate and communicate with one another and the middle school to align schedules and functions so that parents can participate in all functions

·         Possible need to combine parent organizations of primary/intermediate centers

Recommendations for Community Discussion and Input:

·         The superintendent will discuss this proposal with Mayor Calderone

·         The superintendent will discuss this proposal for with Forest Park Teachers’ Association Executive Board

·         The superintendent will provide a copy of the proposal to, and discuss it with, the district administrators

·         The district principals will discuss the proposal with the staff on the Friday following this board meeting

·         The superintendent will meet with the staff of each individual schools to answer questions and have open and honest dialogue

·         The superintendent will discuss the proposal with the Citizens’ Advisory Council and develop a plan with them to gain further input from the community

·         “Town Hall Meetings” about the proposal will be scheduled at each of the elementary schools to provide the opportunity for community input

·         A discussion thread will be started on the Superintendent’s Blog on the district website

Additional Considerations

1.  Grade level centers are not unique in this area.  A few of the area districts that currently have grade-level centers are:

·         Westchester District 92.5

·         River Forest District 90

·         Cicero District 99

·         LaGrange 105 (Kindergarten Centers)

·         Prospect Heights District 23

·         Darien District 61

·         Homewood Flossmoor District 153

We can schedule visits to these centers and talk with members of these communities to gain the perspective of those that have previously implemented grade-level centers.  This would be an ideal task for Citizen’s Advisory Council.

2.       There is very little research evidence supporting or rejecting the organization of schools into grade level centers.  Attached you will find an article on a study done in the Northeast U.S. that simply points out the advantages and disadvantages of various grade configurations (Appendix C).  The précis of the article was that “no one grade configuration is right for all.”  Districts must make decisions about the grade configuration of the attendance centers based on local data and what is in the best interest of students.

3.       In 2006, District 91 hired Information Management Systems (IMS) to conduct a demographic study and provide enrollment projections (see attached pages from the report in Appendix A).  Three variations of the Cohort Survival Method were included with the report.  Method 3 most closely matches our current actual enrollment (enrollment projections do not include EC and JK so our actual enrollment would be 891).  Using this method of projection, the district could lose the equivalent of one of our small attendance centers by 2011-2012.

4.       Adequate yearly progress (AYP) is currently determined by the percentage of students in each subgroup in 3rd and 5th grade that meet or exceed standards at all four of our elementary schools.  If we change to developmental centers, AYP for the primary centers will be determined by the 3rd grade scores from those students who attended the primary center that take the test at the intermediate center.  The scores are “tracked back.”  The 3rd and 5th grade scores will be used to determine AYP for the intermediate centers.  Hence, the third grade scores are counted twice – once for the primary school and once for the intermediate school.

5.       One concern that will likely be raised is the effect of combining students’ ISAT scores from schools that are not achieving at the same level.  If it were true that the scores would be simply a mathematical average of the two schools’ cumulative scores, then the percentage of students meeting and exceeding standards would fall between the percentages of the higher and lower achieving school.  This assumption, however, does not take into consideration other variable that will affect scores such as improved instruction that will be provided by implementing developmental centers and the positive effects of “de-tracking.” 

6.       In their book, Detracking for Excellence and Equity, Burris and Garrity (2008), provide research-based arguments for how providing equal educational opportunities can raise achievement across the board and dramatically narrow the achievement gap.  Research does not support the argument that combining high achieving students and low achieving students will have a negative affect on the achievement of the high achieving students.   A few pages from this book are attached in Appendix C. 

7.       Having the teachers of same grade level classrooms in the same building will allow for better collaboration among teachers.  Currently, teachers in most of our buildings teach their grade level in isolation.  Deliberate effort will be made to ensure that articulation meetings will be scheduled between the primary and intermediate schools as well as between the two primary centers and the two intermediate centers.

8.       Illinois School Code requires that we transport students when the distance is over one mile or there are safety hazards such as major thoroughfares to cross.  While we could possibly eliminate transportation, I would recommend that we consider transporting to the primary centers from the intermediate centers.

 

 

Timeline for Study and Implementation

Fall 2008                             Community input sought through CAC and meetings at schools

November 13, 2008             Citizens Advisory Council Report provided to the Board

December 11, 2008              Recommendation made to the Board for approval

If the recommendation in made to implement Developmental Centers and the Board approves:

Winter 2009                         Plan transition events for students/parents

Spring 2009                         Hold events for students/parents at each school so that they can become familiar with the new attendance center

January 2009                        Staff reorganization plan developed with FPTA

February 2009                     Staff reorganized according to plan

April 2009                           Plan developed for moving equipment and materials

May 2009                            Transition visits to new schools for students

Summer 2009                      Move equipment and materials

Summer 2009                      Developmental Center meetings with staff to plan curriculum and instruction
 
Fall 2009                             Open schools as Developmental Centers

 

 Appendix A

Enrollment Projection Report
Information Management Systems
 
Appendix B
Enrollment
A.      Current Enrollment
B.      Enrollment Scenarios for Developmental Centers

 

 Appendix C

Research
A.      Pagin, C., Fager, J., (1997) Grade Configuration:  Who Goes Where?. Office of Education Research and Improvement.  Washington D.C.
 
B.       Burris, C., Garrity, D., (2008) Detracking for Excellence and Equity. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 10:54am
It's a great idea, in concept and maybe even on paper, but the
implementation isn't done on paper. Off the bat, it's sure to upset those who
bought homes in the "good" school boundaries. They aren't likely to accept the district's logistical problems as their own.

It would require converting and deconverting space in all four schools to fit
to scale. This could only be done between June and August 2009. It might be optimistic to think all four buildings could be done in time for Fall 2009.
You can't put Primary size kids in a Intermediate scaled classroom and vice versa. Well, you could, but not without obstacles for both groups to overcome.

This isn't an insurmountable challenge but would require manpower and optimal conditions. It would also require a buy-in and acceptance by the community. Otherwise, you are creating a situation like the high school (and to lesser extent the middle school) where families opt out. Either enrolling in private schools or leaving the community.

If this has any chance at working, it has to be a community decision. Elsewise, the physical changes will be superficial at best. It's also an all or nothing approach once the conversions are completed.

It still makes sense to present it to the community as the best approach to keep our schools operating at their highest levels.


Afterthought: BTW, the term "Cohort Survival Method" is creepy.



Edited by watcher - 16/September/2008 at 10:56am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote piehead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:04am
What will be the added expense of probably having to bus a lot of kids all over the place?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vorots Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:16am
All of which still points to the bigger picture of the problems with our public high school. One large factor in the declining enrollment is that people who have school age kids are either moving when their oldest gets to high school or not moving here at all. I am very grateful that we have a school board that is trying to solve the problems we face within Forest Park and is doing a fair job of managing the finances of the schools. It is just unfortunate that the first thing anybody mentions is the high school. I hope that this system works for Forest Park, I think that the new superintendant is doing a really good job (how long do you have to be on the job before people stop referring to you as the new guy). Best of luck to them and the transition if it occurs.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Martini Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:38am
Originally posted by piehead piehead wrote:

What will be the added expense of probably having to bus a lot of kids all over the place?
 
 

·         Reduces or provides more efficient transportation program

From the document provided above.

If you read what is in that document it says that right now they are busing kids all over town to class balance. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vorots Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:41am
If that is the closest available school, they might not have to bus them. I think that the state only mandates busing if it is over a certain distance and I am sure that Forest Park is well under that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:52am
Originally posted by vorots vorots wrote:

If that is the closest available school, they might not have to bus them. I think that the state only mandates busing if it is over a certain distance and I am sure that Forest Park is well under that.


Des Plaines, Roosevelt Rd and Madison Street would likely be deemed busy enough to require busing.

There would be more busing overall, but it would be less complicated?
The proposal above suggests busing from the local attendance center for the bulk
of students being moved. Where it will dicey is needing students to be in place earlier so they can be moved. That will either extend the school day or shorten the time available for instruction. Something will have to give.

Full buses are more efficient than half-empty ones. The capacity required can be calculated within a reasonable margin of error.

From here it seems that getting the kids where they need to be is the easiest part of the proposal.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16/September/2008 at 11:10pm
There is a lot of talk about this, and I'm hearing that some parents said they will pull their kids out if this passes.  So much for solving the low enrollment issue.  Parents investigate schools before they move to a neighborhood.  They buy where they want their kids to go.  If they wanted Betsy Ross they moved by Betsy Ross, etc.  I don't think they'd be happy living a block or two from one school, the school they want, and having their kids bused a mile away.  After reading the document above, one concern was currently busing some students and splitting up siblings.  This new proposal will potentially split many, many siblings.  Doesn't seem quite fair for the students or parents.


Edited by itsme - 17/September/2008 at 12:32am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dogcatcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 6:59am

Seems like the BOE is sliding on a very slippery slope.

FOCUS !!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote logic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 8:00am
They could always consider making each neighborhood school PK-8, eliminating the need for middle school. No busing, with the exception of special needs children.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote dogcatcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 8:49am
Now that is the best idea,Thumbs%20Up you should be on the BOE Logic.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote logic Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 9:05am
Moving teachers on a "as needed" basis as opposed to kids. Children remaining with their peers throughout primary school. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bcbandit Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 9:41am
I have to Agree, I went to School in Chicago "Really" And our class room was always 26 to 32 kids Each year,
I think 15 to 20 kids to a class is a waste.

I would make it a K-8  1 of each Grade, And the same for the other schools,
For lunch time, you have k-2 for first lunch, 3-5 for Second lunch, And the 6-8 for the Third lunch,  or 1 and a half hours for lunch time..

If you need PK I think they should have a Building Somewhere in the middle for ALL pk's to go, And Parents Have to Drop off the PK kiddies, They do it now anyways..   BCB..


I'm Chevy Chase and It's Time for the news.
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Actually Would love to Hear from Isis, I think She would be the Top Person on the Board at the moment with some good Ideas? BCB..

I'm Chevy Chase and It's Time for the news.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 9:50am
Hopefully parents will read this and bring your ideas to the meetings.  I was reading it again and was thinking ... what will happen to parental involvement with kids at more than one school?  What about after school activities ... how will kids get home then?  Will the bus go back and get them?
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"They could always consider making each neighborhood school PK-8, eliminating the need for middle school. No busing, with the exception of special needs children. "
 
Yes, yes, yes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote isis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17/September/2008 at 2:23pm
Originally posted by bcbandit bcbandit wrote:

Actually Would love to Hear from Isis, I think She would be the Top Person on the Board at the moment with some good Ideas? BCB..


I'm actually skimming over FPF while I'm downtown trying to get ready for my class...Hard to believe we're drowning at my school!

I'm very interested in commenting, but would like to read the proposal over before I speak :)
All right everyone, line up alphabetically according to your height.
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All parents who will be affected by this need to attend the meetings and be heard.  Go to Forestparkschools.org for the meeting dates, locations and times.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote vorots Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/September/2008 at 1:55pm
My main and overriding concern is this...Does the new proposal create a better learning environment for the kids, and will it better prepare them both academically and socially for the next stage in their life? I could care less if it inconviences me as long as it is better for them. Can't wait to hear what the BOE has to say on this one. Should be a great meeting.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18/September/2008 at 2:38pm
I wouldn't think it would create a better learning environment.  Grant White and Field Stevenson have not produced comparable test scores to Betsy Ross and Garfield.  It's just a fact and a matter of public record.  How does taking half of Betsy Ross's students and sending them to Field help them academically or socially?  The same question for Garfield and Grant White.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote isis Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19/September/2008 at 10:55am
I reviewed the proposal and although several pieces of information needed are missing, this sounds like an idea worthy of further study.

The Superintendent noted other schools that use attendance centers, but are their situations the same? In other words, did these districts have similar challenges as your does?

Developmental centers also tend to follow a certain teaching philosophy throughout the entire school (ex - professional learning communities - PLCs). Is this something that will be included? PLCs are wonderful - infact, my dissertation is on PLCs in schools under restructuring (!) The biggest challenge is having EVERYONE buy into it. That means every administrator and teacher in every building.

The special ed part seems ok, but what about inclusion? Are you going to have inclusion classrooms and self-contained? What if a child should move to from one setting to another? Is that going to require a change in school?

What about gifted ed? I saw nothing in the information about gifted.

Overall, its a good start. Do I think that packet is enough to go to the parents and community with? Absolutely not. There are too many unanswered questions and topics that haven't been addressed.

If anyone has any other questions, shoot them my way. With my school floating somewhere, I've got some free time on my hands.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21/September/2008 at 7:13pm
Originally posted by isis isis wrote:

I reviewed the proposal and although several pieces of information needed are missing, this sounds like an idea worthy of further study.


In reading the information, it seems more like a plan than a proposal. The timeframe for implementation makes it important to make a decision quickly.
The outline above lists 5 solutions that were said to have been considered, then holds provides detail on ONLY #5 and lists public forums to be held to gauge public reaction to #5 ONLY, with a board decision to be made in December.

It also mentioned a discussion of the plan on the Supt. Blog. As of 7p.m. Sunday Sept. 21, there is nothing on the blog except a note about removing a comment regarding computers.

There's nothing wrong with getting one's ducks in a row. There is a great deal wrong with the gaping holes in this plan which must be clearly understood by the stakeholders.

Half-baked ramrodding will not fare well with residents.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21/September/2008 at 9:54pm
That's the impression I got as well.  It doesn't seem like any other options were investigated or at least tried before coming to this conclusion.  It seems like the Supt. went to the last resort first.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21/September/2008 at 10:35pm
Watcher, have you thought about attending a meeting? 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22/September/2008 at 6:26am
Originally posted by itsme itsme wrote:

Watcher, have you thought about attending a meeting? 


It's straight lines like this that start flame wars.

There's a good chance.
"It is a wreave belief that we already are in Hell."- Tuluk in Frank Herbert's "Whipping Star"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22/September/2008 at 8:53am
Yes, Watcher, you fell right into my trap.  Wink


Well, if you're a resident, you have a right to your say.  I think you should go and give your input and point out the problems with this proposal.  I personally think that other options should be explored first.  We really don't know what the main reason for this change is.  Is it money?  Is it enrollment?  Is it trying to help two schools that aren't meeting the minimum testing standards?  There are other ways to try to solve those issues.

Edited by itsme - 22/September/2008 at 8:54am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote watcher Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22/September/2008 at 9:34am
It's been asserted that I don't have the slightest idea of what fopa wants or needs.
I just sit behind a keyboard and rant.

From a community standpoint, attendance centers are a viable alternative to the current model and past practice. As I said, it will be the Betsy and Garfield areas who will most staunchly oppose the change. But the taxes of the whole town support our schools.
Your premise seems to be that we have two tiers operating within our system and that the students at two of our schools are somehow inferior to the other two. That's a difficult position to defend.

Attendance centers would allow devoted resources for a specific age range. It would articulate the curriculum better and remove the stigma that's been attached to our present structure. If the goal is good schools for everyone,
attendance centers are the way to go. But it won't happen if the change results in abandonment by a critical segment of the student body.

They can't force people to attend if they are willing to pay for greener grass elsewhere. The fears will be validated, not because the district changed to attendance centers, but because the schools lost a critical element needed for success. I don't know how you prevent that, but I do know that unless you do, everybody loses.

"It is a wreave belief that we already are in Hell."- Tuluk in Frank Herbert's "Whipping Star"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22/September/2008 at 10:20am
I absolutely am not insinuating that two schools are superior or inferior.   It is what it is.  I am saying that if you check the schools' report cards, which are on the FP.net website, Garfield and Betsy Ross are doing better.  Whatever the reason, they are producing higher test scores.  Is it the teachers?  Is it parental involvement, which is sorely lacking at FS and GW? Is it the Principals?  Is it the transiency rates?  I would think that the Board would want to work on those problems, get the schools on a somewhat even playing field and then if we have to blend them together, it would be easier on the public to swallow.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote itsme Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22/September/2008 at 11:20am
And, btw, why can't the schools follow the same curriculum now?  Is it up to each Principal what curriculum is used?  If so, and a school is not performing well while another one is, then maybe the school board should insist that the underperforming schools follow the same curriculum that is succeeding.  Doesn't that seem like the obvious thing to do first rather than forcing families to shuffle their kids around? 


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